Shenanigans

Rockne became one of the most sought-after speakers in the country.

Rockne became one of the most sought-after speakers in the country.

 

Shenanigans will feature a couple of humorous stories about the “Rock.”

From Chet Grant: When Rock signed a speaking contract with agent Christy Walsh, it was generally understood downtown that he was to speak publicly only with Christy’s OK. One evening at Gardner’s News Depot (Main and Jefferson) Rockne met up with some of the local lads, including Warren Hickey, a carpenter. In keeping with his old practices, Rock stopped to swap wise cracks, and presently told a story. At its conclusion, Hickey, who as usual was out of work on account of lethargy, dug a dime out of his pocket and handed it to the mighty mentor. “What’s this for?” Rock demanded, sensing he was about to be ribbed. He was not disappointed. “Well,” drawled Hickey, “I read in the paper you wasn’t supposed to talk in public anymore without pay, I don’t want you to break your contract on our account.”

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Rockne often dwelt on the desirability of a coaching post at Sing Sing, where the “alumni never come back if they can help it.”

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And here’s one to honor St. Patrick’s Day. It’s from an old Scholastic from the 1940s:

Trumpet Solo From Dome Balcony Was Feature of One Saint Patrick's Day.

On this St. Patrick's Day it appears unlikely that students will be awakened by the notes of a bugler sounding "Reveille" from the top of the Golden Dome -but it can happen here, as has been attested by past history.
Rev. Arthur J. Hope, C.S.C., in his story of Notre Dame's first one hundred years, recalls the time that Tim O'Sullivan, a true son of the old sod, slipped out on the balcony of the Golden Dome and awakened the campus with a stirring trumpet rendition of "St. Patrick's Day in the Morning."

O'Sullivan later joined the priesthood. At another time, Father Hope relates, when Father Edward Sorin had forbade any special celebration of St. Patrick's day (in the interests of Americanism), two novices, Dave O'Leary and John Quinn, became "so aroused by this 'unjust' order" that there should be no wearing of the green, that they went to the chapel, extracted the green ribbon from the missal, cut it in two, pinned the ribbons to their surplices, and marched into the sanctuary.

Quinn and O'Leary were expelled, but later Father Sorin relented and told them that they might stay. O'Leary remained, but Quinn stating that "I've been fired!" took leave from the University-to return at a later date as a distinguished monsignor and to deliver a baccalaureate sermon.

 

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