Semper Victurus

A beautiful Art Deco painting from the The Dome of 1916

A beautiful Art Deco painting from the The Dome of 1916

 
Disce Quasi Semper Victurus Vive Quasi Cras Moriturus"
("Study like you will live forever; live like you will die tomorrow".)
 
Starting in the late 1870's, this rather intimidating phrase was the Scholastic Magazine credo. Ironically, the Scholastic proved to be the vehicle which has allowed the daily experiences of Notre Dame students during the past 150 years to truly "live forever". Scholastics are a virtual gold mine of Notre Dame history, and more importantly, of insight into the daily lives of its students. These first hand reports of campus life, written by student reporters, give a candid and personal view of important (and trivial) events on the Notre Dame campus. Joe Madonia, an '82 alum and partner in the Chicago law firm of Wildman, Harrold, Allen & Dixon, will edit a monthly column of excerpts from his rare and wonderful collection of original Scholastic Magazines spanning the period from 1869 - 1931.
 
Semper Victurus - Stories of Christmas past, from the archives of The Scholastic.
 
Christmas celebrations are a timeless joy - one of the few things which stays constant through the years.  The following Scholastic report from the Christmas of 1918 sounds as if it just as easily could have been written for this season:
 
"On the night before Christmas Eve nature covered the ground and trees with white and what was expected to be a summer Christmas turned out to be a real Noel day.  At twelve o'clock Christmas morning, midnight mass was celebrated.  As the jubiliant sounds of the Gloria in Excelsis echoed through the various chapels at Notre Dame,  all Holy Cross rejoiced again in the birth of the Savior.  Midnight mass has ever been a most cherished ceremony at Notre Dame.  In the early days, the faithful came from miles around to the rude log chapel by St. Mary's lake.  There they heard midnight mass celebrated by Father Sorin, and were thrilled to tears, to tears of joy, as his arms were raised towards heaven and his voice trembled with "glory to God in the highest".  The holy tradition is as fresh today as then, and the occasion is one of holy joy to those students who remain at the University during the holidays...".
 

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