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The Edward N. Hurley College of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.

The Edward N. Hurley College of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.

 

The following description of Hurley Hall is from the superb guide book, Notre Dame, the Official Campus Guide, by Damaine Vonada. It's available in the book section at: http://www.irishlegends.com/Pages/guidebk.html

 

The Edward N. Hurley College of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.

In 1930, Edward Nash Hurley informed President Charles O'Donnell that he wanted to give Notre Dame $200,000 to build a College of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Hurley, a Chicago businessman who had chaired the United States Shipping Board during World War I, decided to make this gift because he was impressed with Notre Dame's leadership in developing a business curriculum that emphasized foreign trade. He requested that Graham, Anderson, Probst and White, the noted architects who had designed Chicago's landmark Wrigley Building, plan the structure for the university, and they produced a superb collegiate Gothic building with leaded glass windows and outstanding brick and stone facades. Among its many attributes were certain custom features designed to indicate international trade. Without a doubt, the most famous of these ornaments was the model of a ship that romantically graced Hurley Hall's front tower and inspired the business college's endearing sobriquet, "The Yacht Club."

After the business college took up residence in Hurley Hall, its focus steadily expanded to include management and administration. By the 1960s, the college sorely needed more space for its new master's degree program, and the remedy for its growing pains once again came from Chicago. Two of the Windy City's prominent travel industry executives-Ramona Hayes Healy and her husband, John Healy-provided much of the funding to build a two-story addition to Hurley Hall in 1968. Graham, Anderson, Probst and White were again enlisted as architects, and they innovatively joined the new Hayes-Healy Center to Hurley Hall via a fine skywalk that allows wonderful, treetop views of a landscaped courtyard between the two buildings. Their architectural encore also included executing Hayes-Healy in an innovative, contemporary interpretation of Gothic design; this styling is not only quite attractive, but also coordinates extremely well with Hurley Hall's more conventional architectural elements.

In 1995, the College of Business Administration moved into a new, worldclass complex on DeBartolo Quad. Hurley Hall and Hayes-Healy Center became the temporary quarters of the architecture school, and two years later, they were used to house administrative offices displaced by the Main Building renovation. When the business college vacated Hurley Hall, its trademark ship also departed for the new port on DeBartolo Quad. The hall's Gothic foyer, however, still contains showpieces from its heyday as a cathedral to commerce: a huge aluminum globe and richly colored murals depicting maps of major trade routes and the seven seas. In the 1930s, Mr. Hurley wanted this foyer to remind students of this nation's important role in world trade, and he had spared no expense to achieve his objective. John Warner Norton, a noted artist who had recently completed the murals in the towering new Chicago Board of Trade building, was commissioned to paint the globe and the maps, while the Rand McNally Company was consulted for the accuracy of geographic details. The globe not only revolved but also could be raised and lowered. Its mechanism came from the company that had designed the stage for the Chicago Civic Opera. The world, of course, has changed drastically since 1932, but, happily, the foyer of Hurley Hall has not. The nations of its globe and murals remain frozen in time, a testimony both to Mr. Hurley's international vision and the generations of students he sought to inspire.

 

 

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